"Renaissances" opens July 1 @ Harrison Center for the Arts by Brian Prugh

An adulterated image of Michelangelo's Laurentian Library, which forms the visual basis for the show.

An adulterated image of Michelangelo's Laurentian Library, which forms the visual basis for the show.

I have a new show opening July 1 in the Harrison Gallery at the Harrison Center for the Arts - 1505 N. Delaware, Indianapolis. 

Opening Reception: July 1, 6-10 pm.

Description:

Are we living in a new dark age? Is this the dawn of another Renaissance - are we experiencing a new re-birth of classical culture?

Classical culture, while it never really dies, is constantly being “reborn.” Occasionally we mark these re-births in history as a “Renaissance.” Teaching just across 16th street from the Harrison Center at Herron High School – a classical liberal arts high school – has given me occasion to reflect on whether we are at the beginning of a new “Renaissance.” If we are, I believe it is urgent to ask two questions: To what are we returning? How shall we make it our own?

"Renaissances" is a provocation to consider these questions and a manifestation of my own (provisional) answers. The installation is loosely based on Michelangelo’s design for the Laurentian Library foyer and reading room in Florence, a design which in turn influenced Mark Rothko’s Seagram murals and his later chapel paintings, which have been influential in my own thinking about painting.

REVIEW: "The Future Past" @ Historic Central State by Brian Prugh

Michael Milano, installation view of Central State Awning. Photo courtesy Art + Space.

Michael Milano, installation view of Central State Awning. Photo courtesy Art + Space.

From the review:

Staged in a one-time cafeteria and another-time carpentry shop on the historic campus of the Central State Hospital, a former mental health facility, “The Future Past” engages what remains of the history of the building. Perhaps it is because of this context that the remains were all the more poignant, and the visual works spoke even more quietly about the place that surrounds them and what happened there.

Read the review at LEAP!

REVIEW: Hannah Barnes @ HCA by Brian Prugh

http://www.leapreview.com/blog/2016/4/6/hannah-barnes-kali-yuga-drawings-for-an-aging-universe

http://www.leapreview.com/blog/2016/4/6/hannah-barnes-kali-yuga-drawings-for-an-aging-universe

From the review:

Barnes’ work is evocative, and makes a case in its own way for the continued relevance of abstract painting. In a time when it seems that all of the possible avenues for abstract painting have been exhausted, Barnes’ work feels relevant not because it’s staking out any new formal territory, but because of the way that it digs into human experience and creates challenging visual encounters.
 

Read the review at LEAP!

Thinking Outside the Academy by Brian Prugh

From left to right: Nick Gelpi, Jan Verwoert, Benjamin Bratton, and Michael Hardt. Photo: Luis Eligio.

From left to right: Nick Gelpi, Jan Verwoert, Benjamin Bratton, and Michael Hardt. Photo: Luis Eligio.

From the essay:

Academics no longer have the luxury to think through problems. ...[I]n order to continue thinking, academics must become productive. In order for their thinking to qualify as production, it must take a very particular form—a form specific to each discipline but one that stamps the work with the seal of credibility. This is what makes it a product.

Read the essay in The Miami Rail or download a PDF.
 

REVIEW: Yann Gerstberger @ Michael Jon by Brian Prugh

Yann Gerstberger, Let It Go (C.F. microvestido blanco), 2014. Cotton, natural dyes (grana cochinilla) and synthetic dyes, solventfree glue, vinyl banner, 116 x 94.5”. Installation view. Photo courtesy Michael Jon Gallery.

Yann Gerstberger, Let It Go (C.F. microvestido blanco), 2014. Cotton, natural dyes (grana cochinilla) and synthetic dyes, solventfree glue, vinyl banner, 116 x 94.5”. Installation view. Photo courtesy Michael Jon Gallery.

From the review:

The images, in their half-emergent state, tug at the flatness of the materials, creating spatial instability and frustrating attempts to grasp the whole. It is here that the materials do their work: the stacks of yarn strands evoke lines of pixels on an old television screen or projector, creating a kind of low-resolution image that gestures toward, but does not clearly articulate, the graphic image. 

Read the review at The Miami Rail.