REVIEW: Shimon Attie @ SLAM by Brian Prugh

Installation photo of Lost in Space (After Huck) by Shimon Attie at the Saint Louis Art Museum.

Installation photo of Lost in Space (After Huck) by Shimon Attie at the Saint Louis Art Museum.

From the review:

Because everything about the work feels academic, everything except the momentary flash, the silence, and the uncertainty: in short, the sense (or hope) that there is more at stake than it looks like there is, and preserved in this the sense that art can, when pushed beyond the limits we’ve drawn around it, do more than we expect it to be able to do.

Read the whole review at The Seen.

EXHIBITION: Together With @ The Bubbler, Madison, WI by Brian Prugh

I'm pleased to be taking part in "Together With," an exhibition with the Hyperlink Artist's collective based in Denver at The Bubbler, an art space in the Madison Central Public Library. Opens Friday, May 5.

Convection, 2017, cut tulle, fishing line and duralar tabs, 50 x 36 inches.

Convection, 2017, cut tulle, fishing line and duralar tabs, 50 x 36 inches.

PRESS RELEASE:

Together With (Madison, WI)

Madison, WI at The Bubbler in Madison Central Library

Curated by Kate Mothes

Opening Reception: Friday, May 5th, 2017

Together With is an exploration of duality, specifically addressing the so-called middle distance between two extremes. The premise of the exhibition was an artistic and geographic exchange, taking place both in Denver, CO, and Madison, WI, in order for artists in the Denver-based artist collective Hyperlink to engage with artists in other parts of the country and vice versa. Whether Denver and Madison are considered West or Midwest, they are both situated within the vast expanse between, and apart from, the two major American art hubs of Los Angeles and New York. Together With draws artists and their work from both coasts while emphasizing the Midwest as a meeting place, a middle ground.

The theme of duality is so broad as to be practically an anti-theme; it invites a diverse range of interpretations. Some artists’ work deliberately explores sub-themes such as the transition between life and death, inside and outside, or body and soul. Some of the work formally interprets duality by using materials we associate with barriers, or creating pieces and spaces that transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional. Additionally, some work operates in a more conceptual sense by juxtaposing the beautiful and the grotesque, the limits or barriers of the body, views on privacy and publicity, and perceptions of the real and the imaginary. The eclectic group of artists and artwork meet in an exhibition wherein multiple dualities revolve around and touch off of one another.

Non-Hyperlink artists: 

REVIEW: Sarah Hobbs @ iMOCA by Brian Prugh

Sarah Hobbs, Untitled (obsessiveness), chromogenic print, 60” x 48”, 2003. Courtesy the artist.

Sarah Hobbs, Untitled (obsessiveness), chromogenic print, 60” x 48”, 2003. Courtesy the artist.

From the review:

The stronger works push past the level of architectural emoticons into the incredibly weird territory at the intersection of domestic work, dream homes, the interior decorating industry and the psychology of performing any task in the modern world. The images are loaded with all kinds of everyday associations, so it is not surprising that the photos began to unwind for me while doing a very ordinary, everyday stay-at-home dad task…

Read the review at The Seen.

REVIEW: Complicated Beauty: Contemporary Cuban Art @ Tampa Museum of Art by Brian Prugh

Libertad Condicional (Conditional Liberty) 06, 2011, Humberto Diaz, Photographs printed on Hahnemuhle photo paper 200g. Edition 5 of 5. The Bronx Museum of the Arts Permanent Collection, Purchased with funds provided by Laura Blanco and Robert F. Shainheit. Image courtesy of the artist.

Libertad Condicional (Conditional Liberty) 06, 2011, Humberto Diaz, Photographs printed on Hahnemuhle photo paper 200g. Edition 5 of 5. The Bronx Museum of the Arts Permanent Collection, Purchased with funds provided by Laura Blanco and Robert F. Shainheit. Image courtesy of the artist.

Review published in The Seen. From the review:

Yoan Capote is quoted in the wall text by his painting as saying, “The sea, for me and for a lot of Cubans, was like a wall, more an image of isolation than a beautiful place. I grew up with a frustration about the limitation and an obsession about crossing the sea.” This idea situates the title of this survey of contemporary Cuban art, Complicated Beauty, currently on view at the Tampa Museum of Art, organized in collaboration with the Bronx Museum of the Arts—the sea, a paradigm of beauty, is complicated when it becomes a barrier or an obstacle.

Read the complete review at The Seen or download a PDF.

REVIEW: Mohau Modisakeng @ Laumeier Sculpture Park by Brian Prugh

Mohau Modisakeng, Endabeni 4, 2015. Courtesy the artist.

Mohau Modisakeng, Endabeni 4, 2015. Courtesy the artist.

From the review:

Each of these three potential readings—the work as dream or vision, potent but mysterious; the work as political vision without apparent call to action; and the work as self-portrait of an obscured self—is in tension with the others, and each layer simultaneously invites and resists other layers of meaning and interpretation to create a deeply ambiguous image. That these layers resist resolution is at once unsettling and charged and does not detract from but contributes to the work’s power.

Read the review at The Seen or download a PDF.

With Truth Comes Beauty by Brian Prugh

From the essay:

The responsibility of the artist is to make visible the very small thing that has been given, particularly, to that artist. We should expect that it will look like nothing given to any other artist that has come before (Christ is that big). It is the job of the artist to make it visible. It is the job of the critic to see it and fumble toward the best expression of it that he or she can. Beyond that there is nothing we can do: goodness and beauty will take care of themselves. They will be perceived when the truth is perceived. And greatness – that is not our business. We should neither desire it nor demand it.

Read the essay at Dappled Things.

REVIEW: Raumlaborberlin @ Pulitzer Arts by Brian Prugh

Installation view of raumlaborberlin: 4562 Enright Avenue, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, 2016. Photograph © 2016 Alise O’Brien Photography

Installation view of raumlaborberlin: 4562 Enright Avenue, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, 2016. Photograph © 2016 Alise O’Brien Photography

From the review:

The idea of contemplating the city takes many guises. Perhaps the most commonplace is to stand back and look at the buildings—to contemplate the city as an abstract geometrical sculpture filled with lights and motion and anonymous people. The city becomes an abstraction against which an individual lives a life. But there is a way in which this fundamentally misunderstands the city, and raumlaborberlin’s attempt to picture the city from the inside of its dwellings out reaches for a truer image: the city, not as monolith, but as a conjunction of individual lives radiating out from their homes.

Read the review at The Seen or download a PDF.

REVIEW: Dara Birnbaum @ SLAM by Brian Prugh

Dara Birnbaum, American, born 1946; Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman, 1978-79; video still from single-channel video, color, stereo sound; 5 minutes 50 seconds; Courtesy of Electronic Arts Intermix, New York

Dara Birnbaum, American, born 1946; Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman, 1978-79; video still from single-channel video, color, stereo sound; 5 minutes 50 seconds; Courtesy of Electronic Arts Intermix, New York

From the review:

... if the cultural content has grown remote, and the technological and formal innovations have become commonplace, what remains in these works to command our interest? That plenty remains is borne out by recent scholarship, which has mined the work in feminist, psychoanalytic, and deconstructive terms. But what was most palpable in watching the videos in the museum was an imperative to turn off the TV: I was surprised by their potency as an antidote to the TV show as an entertainment form.

Read the review at The Seen or download the PDF.